How To Repair And Restore Your Home's Wood Surfaces After Water Damage

Posted on: 19 March 2018

Water damage inside your home, whether from a broken water line or from outside water intrusion and flooding, can leave your home with water damage on many different levels. Flooding of your basement can leave the entire floor area and lower part of the drywall damaged and likely require replacement. But a water leak from the roof can cause damage down an entire wall and onto the section of floor below.
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Don't Let Your Dream of Living in a Waterfront Home Turn Into a Soggy Nightmare

Posted on: 25 October 2017

Most waterfront homes have breathtaking views but, typically, waterfront homes are more susceptible to water damage. In addition to the typical causes of water damage, such as from excessive rain leaks and plumbing disasters, waterfront homes can be infiltrated by water due to the natural erosion, underground hydrostatic pressure, and high humidity levels that occur due to a body of water adjacent to the properties. If you own a waterfront home or are considering buying one, it's important that you understand the tasks that are involved to restore a waterfront property after water damage has occurred due to natural erosion and hydrostatic pressure.
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Why Remodeling After Water Damage Is A Great Option

Posted on: 24 July 2017

Coming home from vacation can often be disappointing, because it means you must get back to reality, but it can be even more disappointing and devastating if you come home to find that your kitchen is flooded. When this happens, you will need to contact a water damage company immediately for help eliminating the water, mold, and other problems. During this process, you may also need to decide if now is the right time to do some home remodeling that you've been wanting to do.
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How To Clean Visible White Mold From Paneling

Posted on: 6 April 2016

If you can see visible white mold growing on paneling in your home, you probably have water damage behind the paneling that is allowing the mold to grow. In order to eradicate the mold entirely, you are going to need to remove the paneling and kill the mold at its source. However, until you have the time and resources to identify the source of the leak and remove the paneling, it is best for safety reasons to remove the visible white mold you can see on your paneling.
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